Category Archives: Lyme in Saskatchewan

Recent in: Lyme in Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan, Canada: Lyme is there and spreading

[CanLyme Note: Lyme disease is not new to Saskatchewan, but it is spreading. Physicians need to be aware and willing to diagnose and, treat clinically based upon the patient response and not a restrictive set of unproven guidelines that limit treatment periods, and they must be able to do so without consequence from their College of Physicians and Surgeons.  Current Continues →

Watch CTV news interview of Dr. Todd Hatchette. A very good example of how opinion, not science, is driving Lyme borreliosis policy in Canada… in spite of evidence presented by experts in Ottawa, May 15th to 17th, 2016.

[Lyme disease is actually Lyme borreliosis. an infection caused by many different strains/genotypes of Borrelia bacteria] How can one rationalize making progress from the patient’s expert perspective when officially, by tax payer funded microbiologists, opinion is put forward as fact with no supporting science. Dr. Todd Hatchette attended the recent three day conference in Ottawa during which a wide diversity Continues →

Saskatchewan’s invisible struggle with Lyme disease

Nov, 2015 By Lisa Schick When it comes to Lyme disease in Saskatchewan, those who suffer from it appear to be invisible when it comes to cases reported to the public. Those who do have it live in anguish, like one man who was in so much pain he couldn’t get out of bed, or one woman who was left Continues →

People, Pets, and Parasites: One Health Surveillance in Southeastern Saskatchewan

Abstract   Residents of remote and Indigenous communities might experience higher exposure to some zoonotic parasites than the general North American population. Human sero-surveillance conducted in two Saulteaux communities found 113 volunteers exposed as follows: Trichinella (2.7%), Toxocara canis (4.4%), Echinococcus (4.4%), and Toxoplasma gondii (1.8%). In dogs, 41% of 51 fecal samples were positive for at least one intestinal parasite, 3% Continues →