Category Archives: For Physicians

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What’s driving the explosion in Lyme Disease in Canada?

In today’s Big Story podcast, it’s a disease we never expected to see with any regularity in Canada, only to realize—perhaps too late—that maybe that was dumb. It’s a mistake to think of Lyme Disease as a rare illness now. Because all the data we have—and we don’t have enough—shows us that it is exploding in Canada, with numbers spiking Continues →

Time for Canada to follow U.S. recognition of mother-to-fetus Lyme disease transmission, says Mount Allison biologist

Andrew Rankin (arankin@herald.ca) February 11, 2020 SACKVILLE, N.B. —  The federal U.S. public health agency has set an example for Canada to follow by acknowledging that Lyme disease could be passed from mother to fetus with serious consequences, says a Mount Allison University expert. “The first step is acknowledging that the transmission happens,” said Vett Lloyd, a biologist and founding Continues →

Chronic Lyme Disease: An Evidence-Based Definition by the ILADS Working Group

Abstract Objective: Chronic Lyme disease has been a poorly defined term and often dismissed as a fictitious entity. In this paper, the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS) provides its evidence-based definition of chronic Lyme disease. Definition: ILADS defines chronic Lyme disease (CLD) as a multisystem illness with a wide range of symptoms and/or signs that are either continuously Continues →

Lyme disease in children: Data from the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program

Online November 30th, 2019 Abstract BACKGROUND: Lyme disease (LD) is an infectious disease that is emerging in eastern and central Canada associated with the spread of the tick vector Ixodes scapularis. National surveillance shows that children are an at-risk age group. OBJECTIVES: To study the epidemiology of LD in Canadian children using the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program (CPSP) to better understand exposure history, clinical manifestations, Continues →

Dr. Neil Spector presents new research on diagnostics and treatment

November 18th, 2019 Dr. Neil Spector, a world famous cancer researcher who contracted Lyme disease, gives an amazing presentation of potential new diagnostics and treatments for Lyme borreliosis and other infections. He is grateful for the support of the Steven and Alexandra Cohen Foundation. Watch full presentation

Disulfiram (Tetraethylthiuram Disulfide) in the Treatment of Lyme Disease and Babesiosis: Report of Experience in Three Cases

Abstract   Three patients, each of whom had required intensive open-ended antimicrobial therapy for control of the symptoms of chronic relapsing neurological Lyme disease and relapsing babesiosis, were able to discontinue treatment and remain clinically well for periods of observation of 6–23 months following the completion of a finite course of treatment solely with disulfiram. One patient relapsed at six Continues →

Most recent American Psychiatric Association guidelines… check for Lyme disease in evaluation.

[CanLyme Note: The wording indicates locally endemic infectious diseases so that would also include the known co-infections of Lyme and other vector-borne diseases.  We need to find out what the Canadian Psychiatric Association (CPA) guidelines are relative to infectious diseases.  CanLyme has asked the CPA for their position on this. Limiting their investigation to the current anti-body testing model may miss Continues →

Scotland, UK: Killer tick-borne parasite imitating malaria-like diseases is discovered by scientists in the UK

November 2019 by Shreyas Tanna Medical Herald A tick-borne parasite which causes a deadly malaria-like illness is spreading in the UK. Deadly malaria-like diseases are being spread in the UK by a tick-borne parasite. Babesia venatorum, the name of the discovered parasite, lives in sheep in the Scottish Highlands, according to researchers. People visiting the region have been warned by Continues →

Extensive Distribution of the Lyme Disease Bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato, in Multiple Tick Species Parasitizing Avian and Mammalian Hosts across Canada

Abstract Lyme disease, caused by the spirochetal bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Bbsl), is typically transmitted by hard-bodied ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). Whenever this tick-borne zoonosis is mentioned in medical clinics and emergency rooms, it sparks a firestorm of controversy. Denial often sets in, and healthcare practitioners dismiss the fact that this pathogenic spirochetosis is present in their area. For distribution of Bbsl Continues →

Rickettsial infections of the central nervous system

[CanLyme Note: The Canadian medical community is absolutely under-informed on tick-borne disease. Medical leadership in Canada, managed by non-medical (PHAC), medically unethical (AMMI), scientifically unethical (CIHR), taxpayer funded gatekeepers for the for-profit medical industry insure never ending sickness that generates billions of dollars while denying access to policy making decisions of those most affected… patients and their experts. When will there Continues →

Tick-borne disease can be transmitted in as little as 15 seconds of attachment new study reveals.

[CanLyme Note: In the western regions of North America Dermacentor andersonii is a major vector of Rickettsia rickettsii. Because rickettsial infections in humans appear to be expressed from mild to fatal it is possible many misdiagnoses have occurred over the decades. “Rickettsial infections can affect many organs, including the central nervous system (CNS) ” Also, the possibility of congenital transmission must be explored Continues →

Nova Scotia, Canada: Lyme disease conference held in Bridgewater

November 17th, 2019 CTV reporter Heidi Petracek @HeidipCTV As the number of reported cases of Lyme disease on Nova Scotia’s South Shore continues to rise, so too does public concern. That’s why hundreds of residents and medical professionals gathered in Bridgewater this weekend for the Bridgewater Lyme Disease Conference. “When you look at the map of infected areas, this province Continues →

Montreal: Lyme disease cases on the rise in Quebec

[CanLyme Note: The numbers reported in this article are only the tip of the iceberg. You can safely multiply the 371 in 2019 at least 10 fold (3710 cases in Quebec alone for only one year) to reflect the true number and that is well known to the Quebec medical leadership who advise government. It is well known to the rest Continues →