Category Archives: Lyme Controversy

Recent in: Lyme Controversy

‘Every season is tick season’: Experts warn of winter Lyme disease risk [bitten while xmas tree hunting]

[CanLyme Note: Ticks are active in temperatures of minus 4 degrees Celsius and above] November 22, 2017 by Marina von Stackelberg CBCNEWS People have ‘let their guard down’ and aren’t checking for ticks as weather cools, says zoologist   Laurenne Schiller loves taking her dog Cousteau for walks along Halifax trails as the weather cools. But even after the first dusting Continues →

Towards a Better Understanding of the Brain and Body Interaction

“It is all in your head”. An assessment that is all too familiar to many patients with little understood emergent diseases such as ME, PANS or Lyme. Together with the rise of complex chronic illnesses caused by stealth pathogens, we witness a rise of the invention of so-called ‘somatic disorders’. This is of concern to both patients, who are often declared to Continues →

Lyme Disease Patients File Federal Antitrust Suit Against Infectious Disease Specialists & Health Insurers

Nov 15th, Last Friday, 28 patients filed a federal antitrust lawsuit against the Infectious Diseases Society of America, eight health insurance companies, and seven medical doctors, Courthouse News reported yesterday, “because health insurers are denying coverage with bogus guidelines established by their paid consultants, who falsely say the disease can always be cured with a month of antibiotics.” Contrary to the often-reported claim that Lyme disease Continues →

Mount Allison’s Lyme Research Network launches Maritime Tick Portal

Nov 15th, 2017 SACKVILLE, NB — Mount Allison University’s Lyme Research Network (LYRN) has released a new resource to help New Brunswickers track ticks in the region. The website – maritimetickmaps.ca – allows users to explore maps of the current and projected geographic distribution of the blacklegged tick in New Brunswick. The project is a collaboration between Mount Allison biologist Dr. Vett Lloyd and Dr. David Continues →

Tick-borne anaplasmosis surging in Maine – and it’s worse than Lyme

[CanLyme note: Canada is only a few hour flight for our many migratory birds who come from Maine (and all of USA) to Canada carrying these infected ticks to our parks, school yards and our back yards.] November 13th, 2017 The illness produces more severe symptoms than Lyme disease and is more difficult to detect; reported cases surged from 52 five Continues →

Lyme bug stronger than antibiotics in animals and test tubes. Now study people.

[CanLyme note: This article supports the Canadian patient’s request of federal and provincial governments to stop blatantly endorsing the Infectious Disease Society of America and the United States Center for Disease Control. They refuse open discussion and evaluation of their policy while condemning tens of thousands to a lifetime of hell, or sadly, in too many cases needless death.] November 2nd, Continues →

MacLean’s magazine: How the new impatient patient is disrupting medicine

Patient activists have never been as vocal. But are they truly being heard? Anne Kingston October 21, 2017In late August, Sue Faber and Jennifer Kravis hauled close to 150 pounds of documents and scientific research into a Health Canada office in Ottawa. The two women, co-founders of Lyme-patient advocacy group LymeHope, had been granted a 15-minute audience with then federal Continues →

Researcher says tick-borne disease Borrelia has grown exponentially in Finland

October 5th, 2017 New research finds that ticks are not only becoming more common in Finland but incidents of the tick-borne disease Borrelia – also known as Lyme disease – has grown exponentially in the past 20 years. A new study by a doctoral student found that one-in-six ticks in Finland now carry the disease. Read article

Popular Shrub Linked to Rising Rates of Lyme Disease in Ticks

[CanLyme note: Japanese barberry, an invasive plant, has been promoted as a decorative shrub for landscaping across Canada for many years, even in the dry Okanagan Valley region of BC In Canada, plant growers, retailers, and landscapers need to take this seriously and stop selling this product and similar products.  Offer your concerns to the Canadian Landscape Nursery Association. This is Continues →

Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario: Local tick reports up sharply over last year

[CanLyme note: This article says only one tick per year is testing positive for Lyme disease.  Research has shown us that their tests are not capable of detecting all the known strains of Lyme borreliosis.  If you do not have the correct test for all the strains you have no idea of true prevalence. The government knows this and should properly Continues →

Tips after Lyme Disease is in your system

From Toronto Sun Sept 23rd, 2017 “With the Public Health test, chronic sufferers like me can be misdiagnosed. Although options are available to treat Lyme, because they are not covered by OHIP or widespread, they are inaccessible to many. From my experiences, the Lyme care in Ontario seems insufficient. We all pay taxes and to incur additional medical expenditures to Continues →

The cost of Lyme borreliosis.

Eur J Public Health. 2017 Jun 1;27(3):538-547. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw269. Abstract BACKGROUND: Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most frequently reported tick-borne infection in Europe and North America. The aim of this study was to estimate the cost-of-illness of LB in the Netherlands. We used available incidence estimates from 2010 for tick bite consultations and three symptomatic LB outcomes: erythema migrans (EM), disseminated LB Continues →

Watch New York State Senate Public Hearing on Lyme and Tick Borne Diseases

LYME SCI: Re-cap of New York’s Lyme disease hearing On August 29, the New York State Senate’s Task Force on Lyme and Tick-borne Diseases held a public hearing, with participation from many stakeholders. Public health officials, scientists, patients, and doctors from IDSA and ILADS all addressed the committee hearing, which was streamed live to a national audience. Senator Sue Serino, Continues →