Category Archives: Research

CanLyme is dedicated to promoting advancements in Lyme disease research. More research is needed to accurately diagnose and treat Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses and CanLyme has taken measures to address this, see our Venture Grants Policy.

CanLyme board member Reuben Kaufman, PhD has an ambitious tick study project underway on Salt Spring Island, BC and his program is also able to feed ticks to another CanLyme board member Janet Sperling who is completing her doctorate on examining the various pathogens that are found in the guts of Canadian ticks.
The articles and abstracts below have primarily been sourced from: or the individual journals in which they were published. Please click the PubMed or journal link to read the whole article on their site.

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Recent in: Research

Detecting the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia Burgdorferi, in Ticks Using Nested PCR

Melanie K. B. Wills, Andrea M. Kirby, Vett K. Lloyd Department of Biology, Mount Allison University J. Vis. Exp. (132), e56471, doi:10.3791/56471 (2018) Detecting the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia Burgdorferi, in Ticks Using Nested PCR ABSTRACT Lyme disease is a serious vector-borne infection that is caused by the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato family of spirochetes, which are transmitted to humans through the bite of Continues →

Combining public participatory surveillance and occupancy modelling to predict the distributional response of Ixodes scapularis to climate change

Volume 9, Issue 3, March 2018, Pages 695-706 David J Lieske, Vett K. Lloyd Abstract Ixodes scapularis, a known vector of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (Bbss), is undergoing range expansion in many parts of Canada. The province of New Brunswick, which borders jurisdictions with established populations of I. scapularis, constitutes a range expansion zone for this species. To better understand the current and potential future distribution Continues →

Citizen Science and Community Engagement in Tick Surveillance-A Canadian Case Study.

Healthcare 2018, 6(1), 22; doi:10.3390/healthcare6010022 Julie Lewis, Corinne R. Boudreau, James W. Patterson, Jonathan Bradet-Legris, Vett K. Lloyd Abstract Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in North America and Europe, and on-going surveillance is required to monitor the spread of the tick vectors as their populations expand under the influence of climate change. Active surveillance involves teams of researchers collecting Continues →

Canadian Lyme Consortium makes announcement to Lyme community

February 6th, 2018 On behalf of a growing team of scientists, advocates, and clinicians, we wanted to let you know about a national research network that is taking shape to confront the escalating Lyme disease crisis. The Canadian Lyme Consortium has evolved from the urgent need to accelerate progress in the understanding, detection, and treatment of Lyme disease, and to Continues →

Cranial neuropathy and severe pain due to early disseminated Borrelia burgdorferi infection

Published January 23rd, 2018 doi:10.1136/bcr-2017-223307 [CanLyme Note: What is sick about this case report is that this man’s health outcome, which should be an educational source for all is being sold for profit by the British Medical Journal – just as other alleged “esteemed’ medical journals do.  We must stop this institutionalized rape of our personal information.] Summary A 61-year-old man presented Continues →

An Unusual Cluster of Neuroinvasive Lyme Disease Cases Presenting With Bannwarth Syndrome in the Midwest United States

[CanLyme note:  This statement, “Garin-Bujadoux-Bannwarth syndrome (Bannwarth syndrome [BWS]) is an uncommon manifestation of neuroinvasive Lyme disease (LD) caused by infection with members of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Bbsl)” indicates BWS in an uncommon manifestation of Lyme disease but may suggest it is a rarely connected manifestation of Lyme borreliosis.] Published: 23 December 2017 Abstract Bannwarth syndrome (BWS), an infrequent manifestation of neuroinvasive Lyme Continues →

Human seroprevalence of Borrelia miyamotoi in Manitoba, Canada, in 2011-2014: a cross-sectional study.

CMAJ Open. 2017 Sep 6;5(3):E690-E693. doi: 10.9778/cmajo.20170070. Kadkhoda K, et al Abstract BACKGROUND: Hard tick-borne relapsing fever caused by Borrelia miyamotoi has been reported in Russia, the Netherlands, Germany, Japan and the northeastern and upper midwestern United States. We sought to investigate the presence of B. miyamotoi infection in humans in Manitoba, Canada. METHODS: Two hundred fifty sera collected from residents Continues →

CANADA, CASE REPORT: New-onset Bell palsy and Lyme disease

[Canlyme Note: It is important for physicians to be aware that treatment duration is to be determined by the clinical presentation not by preset limitations. The only recognized guidelines that meet the Institute of Medicine GRADE level criteria, which are the only Lyme disease guidelines published on the US government guideline website, are those published by the International Lyme and Associated Continues →

Spain has significant risk areas for contracting Lyme disease (borreliosis)

Molecular identification of Borrelia spirochetes in questing Ixodes ricinus from northwestern Spain Published online December 20th, 2107 Pablo Diaz et al ABSTRACT Background Ixodes ricinus, the predominant tick species in Europe, can transmit the causative agents of important human diseases such as Lyme borreliosis (LB), caused by Borrelia spirochetes. In northern Spain, LB is considered endemic; recently, a significant increase of the annual incidence of LB was Continues →

Nearly 50% of ticks test positive for Lyme bacteria in Onondaga County

[CanLyme Note: This area is only a short flight to Ontario and Quebec for the migratory birds such as robins, wrens, and finches who carry these infected ticks into your region in the millions each season. Canada is endemic for Lyme disease and our government needs to stop wasting money chasing ticks and start funding research to find out how many Continues →

Late Disseminated Lyme Disease: Associated Pathology and Spirochete Persistence Post-Treatment in Rhesus Macaques

DOI: Nicholas A. Crossland, Xavier Alvarez, Monica E. Embers Abstract Non-human primates currently serve as the best experimental model for Lyme disease due to their close genetic homology with humans and demonstration of all three phases of disease following infection with Borreliella (Borrelia) burgdorferi (Bb). We investigated the pathology associated with late disseminated Lyme disease (12 to 13 months following tick inoculation) Continues →

Lyme disease in North America for 20,000 years

Lyme bacteria settled in North America far earlier than we thought While the Lyme disease outbreak in people dates back only about 40 years, the bacterium that causes this disease has called North America home for more than 20,000 years, according to a study published in August in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution. The epidemic began when a set of strange Continues →