Category Archives: Research

CanLyme is dedicated to promoting advancements in Lyme disease research. More research is needed to accurately diagnose and treat Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses and CanLyme has taken measures to address this, see our Venture Grants Policy.

CanLyme board member Reuben Kaufman, PhD has an ambitious tick study project underway on Salt Spring Island, BC and his program is also able to feed ticks to another CanLyme board member Janet Sperling who is completing her doctorate on examining the various pathogens that are found in the guts of Canadian ticks.
The articles and abstracts below have primarily been sourced from: PubMed.gov or the individual journals in which they were published. Please click the PubMed or journal link to read the whole article on their site.

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Recent in: Research

Antibiotic gel shows promise in preventing onset of Lyme borreliosis following tick bite

December 2016 Topical azithromycin for the prevention of Lyme borreliosis: a randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 3 efficacy trial   An antibiotic gel based on azithromycin, helps with prevention of Lyme disease following a tick bite. That is the finding of a multi-centre international study, in which MedUni Vienna’s Department of Clinical Pharmacology played an important part. The study is now been Continues →

The Lyme disease pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi infects murine bone and induces trabecular bone loss

Tian Tian Tang, Lucia Zhang, Anil Bansal, Marc Grynpas, and Tara J. Moriarty Accepted Manuscript Posted Online 12 December 2016 Infect. Immun. doi:10.1128/IAI.00781-16 Copyright © 2016 Tang et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. ABSTRACT Lyme disease is caused by members of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species Continues →

Bill to combat Lyme disease heads to Pres. Obama for signature

December 7th, 2016 WASHINGTON (NEWS10) – The U.S. Senate passed legislation to combat Lyme and other tick-borne diseases. The bill now heads to President Obama’s desk for signature. If signed into law, it would ensure coordination among federal agencies and researchers, health care providers, and patient organizations in addressing tick-borne illnesses. “This is an important advancement to help combat the Continues →

Ceftriaxone Pulse Dosing Fails to Eradicate Biofilm-Like Microcolony B. burgdorferi Persisters Which Are Sterilized by Daptomycin/ Doxycycline/Cefuroxime without Pulse Dosing

Published Nov 2016 Abstract   Although the majority of Lyme disease patients can be cured, at least 10–20% of the patients continue to suffer from persisting symptoms such as fatigue, muscular and joint pain, and neurologic impairment after standard 2–4 week antibiotic treatment. While the causes for this post-treatment Lyme disease symptoms are unclear, one possibility is due to Borrelia Continues →

Australia: A Senate inquiry has recommended urgent government funding for research into tick-borne disease in Australia.

Nov. 30th, 2016 Inquiry calls for Lyme funding, research   A Senate committee has recommended the federal government urgently increase funding for research into tick-borne disease in Australia and get to work on finding a treatment. Thousands of Australians claim to be suffering from tick-borne Lyme disease, but medical authorities insist it’s not possible to contract the disease in Australia. Continues →

Johns Hopkins receives $10M to expand research into Lyme disease cause, treatments

Grants from Steven and Alexandra Cohen Foundation support existing research on post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome, new therapies, vulnerable populations   Johns Hopkins University has received a $10 million grant from the Steven and Alexandra Cohen Foundation to explore Lyme disease and develop potential new therapies to address the illness. The grant will be divided among three Johns Hopkins research teams Continues →

Established Population of Blacklegged Ticks with High Infection Prevalence for the Lyme Disease Bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato, on Corkscrew Island, Kenora District, Ontario

2016; 13(11): 881-891. doi: 10.7150/ijms.16922 Abstract We document an established population of blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis, on Corkscrew Island, Kenora District, Ontario, Canada. Primers of the outer surface protein A (OspA) gene, the flagellin (fla) gene, and the flagellin B (flaB) gene were used in the PCR assays to detect Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), the Lyme disease bacterium. In Continues →

YOU CAN’T COUNT ON TESTING OF ENGORGED TICKS

A recent study published in the Journal of Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases examined the prevalence of ticks in the Quebec region, along with the frequency of Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) infection in engorged versus non-engorged ticks. by Daniel J. Cameron, MD MPH Gasmi and colleagues found that you cannot always rely on the testing of engorged ticks to help determine possible Continues →

Hide and Seek: How Lyme Disease Spirochetes Overcome Complement Attack

Peter Kraiczy* Institute of Medical Microbiology and Infection Control, University Hospital of Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany Overcoming the first line of the innate immune system is a general hallmark of pathogenic microbes to avoid recognition and to enter the human host. In particular, spirochetes belonging to the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex have developed various means to counter the Continues →

Steroid Use Questioned for Common Lyme Disease Manifestation

[CanLyme Note: Facial palsy, Bell’s Palsy, is not as common in Lyme patients as reported. It is easily recognized making those patients much more likely to be diagnosed. Most patients with Lyme disease do not experience facial palsy as it is typically a facial numbness and tingling/burning, often around the mouth, nose, and the tongue.] Sept. 7th, 2016 Compared to antibiotic Continues →

CanLyme director responds to Canadian Medical Association Journal article

Response to Doctors Gregson and Quach Robert G. Murray, DDS, Director, CanLyme Re: “The Lyme law” Zubek, 187:520-521doi:10.1503/cmaj.115-0029 The problem with Lyme disease in Canada will only continue to grow to the point where the numbers affected will simply overwhelm the idea that Lyme Borreliosis (LB) is hard to catch and easy to treat with a short round of antibiotics. Continues →

Exotic ticks appear to be establishing themselves in Alaska

Alaska Dispatch News Monday, August 29th, 2016 While Alaskans have long endured dense mosquitoes and frigid air, we’ve always had the absence of venomous snakes and dog ticks. But the latter may be establishing themselves here. Ticks that infest red squirrels, snowshoe hares and a variety of birds have always been present in Alaska, but a team of biologists and veterinarians Continues →

Tick study gets ‘astonishing’ local response

John Ferro, Poughkeepsie Journal Photo by Sophia Raithel When the scientists behind an ambitious tick studybegan their work in April, they did not know how many Dutchess County families would be willing to grant access to their properties and personal health information. The subjects would have to let researchers onto their yards repeatedly to collect rodents, count ticks and deploy as many as two tick-killing Continues →