Category Archives: Co-infections

Recent in: Co-infections

Human seroprevalence of Borrelia miyamotoi in Manitoba, Canada, in 2011-2014: a cross-sectional study.

CMAJ Open. 2017 Sep 6;5(3):E690-E693. doi: 10.9778/cmajo.20170070. Kadkhoda K, et al Abstract BACKGROUND: Hard tick-borne relapsing fever caused by Borrelia miyamotoi has been reported in Russia, the Netherlands, Germany, Japan and the northeastern and upper midwestern United States. We sought to investigate the presence of B. miyamotoi infection in humans in Manitoba, Canada. METHODS: Two hundred fifty sera collected from residents Continues →

Lyme in the maritimes: Health P.E.I. should re-evaluate efforts at prevention and diagnosis of tick-borne diseases

BY CHRIS ROBINSON [ – Chris Robinson is a health economist / epidemiologist, and former head of Evidence and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada. He is now retired and living in Cavendish ] January 9th, 2017 published by The Guardian There are no deer on P.E.I. Local public health officials have Continues →

Towards a Better Understanding of the Brain and Body Interaction

“It is all in your head”. An assessment that is all too familiar to many patients with little understood emergent diseases such as ME, PANS or Lyme. Together with the rise of complex chronic illnesses caused by stealth pathogens, we witness a rise of the invention of so-called ‘somatic disorders’. This is of concern to both patients, who are often declared to Continues →

Tick-borne anaplasmosis surging in Maine – and it’s worse than Lyme

[CanLyme note: Canada is only a few hour flight for our many migratory birds who come from Maine (and all of USA) to Canada carrying these infected ticks to our parks, school yards and our back yards.] November 13th, 2017 The illness produces more severe symptoms than Lyme disease and is more difficult to detect; reported cases surged from 52 five Continues →

Lyme bug stronger than antibiotics in animals and test tubes. Now study people.

[CanLyme note: This article supports the Canadian patient’s request of federal and provincial governments to stop blatantly endorsing the Infectious Disease Society of America and the United States Center for Disease Control. They refuse open discussion and evaluation of their policy while condemning tens of thousands to a lifetime of hell, or sadly, in too many cases needless death.] November 2nd, Continues →

Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario: Local tick reports up sharply over last year

[CanLyme note: This article says only one tick per year is testing positive for Lyme disease.  Research has shown us that their tests are not capable of detecting all the known strains of Lyme borreliosis.  If you do not have the correct test for all the strains you have no idea of true prevalence. The government knows this and should properly Continues →

Watch New York State Senate Public Hearing on Lyme and Tick Borne Diseases

LYME SCI: Re-cap of New York’s Lyme disease hearing On August 29, the New York State Senate’s Task Force on Lyme and Tick-borne Diseases held a public hearing, with participation from many stakeholders. Public health officials, scientists, patients, and doctors from IDSA and ILADS all addressed the committee hearing, which was streamed live to a national audience. Senator Sue Serino, Continues →


by Daniel J. Cameron, MD, MPH In Wisconsin, between 2001 and 2015, “there was a 26-fold increase in the incidence of confirmed babesiosis, in addition to geographic expansion,” according to MMWR. [1] The report listed suburbanization, forest fragmentation patterns, and warming average temperatures as potential causes behind the surge. The rising prevalence of co-infections in rodents may also be to blame for the Continues →

CBC News: Lyme disease research, funding falling behind in Canada

June 18th, 2017 – by Jennifer Seiff for CBC News When I got sick in May 2016 with what I suspected was Lyme disease, I learned fast about tick-borne illnesses in Canada. What I learned was that out-of-date lab tests mean many people may altogether miss a diagnosis of Lyme — an infectious disease spread through the bite of infected ticks that can produce Continues →