Tag Archives: burgdorferi

Lyme disease in Saskatchewan ticks, and dog ticks can infect Borrelia miyamotoi.

The vast majority of ticks found in Saskatchewan are Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), a species not known to be a competent vector of typical Lyme borreliosis (Borrelia burrgdorferi s.l.) to humans.  However, recently Borrelia miyamotoi has been found in Canadian ticks coast to coast. Also, this from Manitoba, Saskatchewan’s next door neighbour. Borrelia miyamotoi causes similar disease in humans to Lyme borreliosis. Needing more Continues →

The Need for Clinical Judgment in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Lyme Disease

Abstract Clinical practice guidelines are increasing in number. Unfortunately, when scientific evidence is uncertain, limited, or evolving, as is often the case, conflict often arises between guideline committees and practicing physicians, who bear the direct responsibility for the care of individual patients. The 2006 Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines for Lyme disease, which have limited scientific support, could, if Continues →

Identification of Additional Anti-Persister Activity against Borrelia burgdorferi from an FDA Drug Library

Sept, 2015 Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA Abstract   Lyme disease is a leading vector-borne disease in the United States. Although the majority of Lyme patients can be cured with standard 2–4 week antibiotic treatment, 10%–20% of patients continue to suffer from prolonged post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome Continues →

Invariant natural killer T cells act as an extravascular cytotoxic barrier for joint-invading Lyme Borrelia

Maria-Jesus Sanz, Connie H. Y. Wong, Pierre-Olivier Hardy, Aydan Salman-Dilgimen, Tara J. Moriart, George Chaconas, Adriana Marques, Roman Krawetz, Christopher H. Mody, Paul Kubes Abstract CXCR6-GFP+ cells, which encompass 70% invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells), have been found primarily patrolling inside blood vessels in the liver. Although the iNKT cells fail to interact with live pathogens, they do respond Continues →

Remarkable diversity of tick or mammalian-associated Borreliae in the metropolitan San Francisco Bay Area, California

Natalia Fedorova, Joyce E. Kleinjan, David James, Lucia T. Hui, Hans Peeters, Robert S. Lane Abstract The diversity of Lyme disease (LD) and relapsing fever (RF)-group spirochetes in the metropolitan San Francisco Bay area in northern California is poorly understood. We tested Ixodes pacificus, I. spinipalpis, and small mammals for presence of borreliae in Alameda County in the eastern portion Continues →

First detection of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato DNA in king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus halli).

Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, Available online 20 August 2014. Abstract The hard tick Ixodes uriae parasitises a wide range of seabird species in the circumpolar areas of both Northern and Southern hemispheres and has been shown to be infected with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the bacterial agents of Lyme borreliosis. Although it is assumed that seabirds represent viable reservoir hosts, direct Continues →

The prevalence of Borrelia miyamotoi infection, and co-infections with other Borrelia spp. in Ixodes scapularis ticks collected in Canada

Antonia Dibernardo, Tyler Cote, Nicholas H Ogden and L Robbin Lindsay Published: 15 April 2014 Abstract (provisional) Background Blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis are vectors of the tick-borne pathogens Borrelia  burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti. Recently, the I. scapularis-borne   bacterium Borrelia miyamotoi has been linked to human illness in North America. The range of this tick is expanding in Canada which may Continues →

Tick-borne Pathogens in Northwestern California, USA [ B. miyamotoi is as abundant as its congener B. burgdorferi but is not tested for in humans ]

Daniel J. Salkeld , Stephanie Cinkovich, and Nathan C. Nieto To the Editor: In northwestern California, USA, the western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus, is a known vector ofBorrelia burgdorferi, the spirochete that causes Lyme disease.B. miyamotoi, which is more closely related to spirochetes that cause relapsing fever, has also been detected in 2 locations in California (1,2) and has recently been implicated as a Continues →