Tag Archives: ticks

How to repel ticks with plants and landscaping

Landscaping tactics can be used to create a soft barrier to prevent ticks from entering your yard   Ticks are now present in many parts of the Maritimes, but communities are still learning how to live with them. A tick-proofing conference and workshop at Mount Allison University on Saturday gave researchers and experts a chance to share knowledge about ways to protect humans, Continues →

Unravelling the mystery of Lyme disease: Why Canada needs to do more

Rian Michelsen is a rising star. Fifteen years ago, he was the toddler who burst out from behind the curtains singing Elvis’ Viva Las Vegas. As a young boy, he played the lead role in Oliver in his birthplace of Bermuda, before moving with his family to Toronto five years ago. Now, as a 17 year-old high school student, he’s a gifted singer Continues →

Lyme Disease Awareness Month

NO TICK IS A GOOD TICK, all species of ticks that will attach to humans and pets can carry various diseases. May, 2020 May is National Lyme Disease Awareness Month in Canada. It gives us a chance to remind and educate others about the disease and how to avoid it. Ticks aren’t going to give us a break this year Continues →

Dr. Ralph G. Hawkins: Bridging Differences

Dr. Ralph Hawkins gave an excellent talk at the Bridgewater, N.S. conference where he delved into the many problems with diagnostics, treatment and surveillance of Lyme disease. He also broached the topic from a legal perspective discussing the legal principles pertaining to Standard of Care. Watch presentation

Turkey tick news: A molecular investigation into the presence of tick-borne pathogens in host-seeking ticks in Anatolia; Initial evidence of putative vectors and pathogens, and footsteps of a secretly rising vector tick, Haemaphysalis parva.

[CanLyme Note: The title may mislead some to believe they are studying a turkey tick.  This is a study of ticks in the country of Turkey.] Abstract This Turkey-based study investigated the presence of various tick-borne microorganisms in a broad-range of host-seeking ticks (n = 1019) that exhibit both hunter and ambusher characteristics. All collected ticks were analyzed individually via PCR-sequencing, resulting in Continues →

Prevalence of Infection and Co-Infection and Presence of Rickettsial Endosymbionts in Ixodes Scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in Connecticut, USA.

Abstract Ixodes scapularis is currently known to transmit 7 pathogens responsible for Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, babesiosis, tick-borne relapsing fever, ehrlichiosis, and Powassan encephalitis. Ixodes scapularis can also be colonized by endosymbiotic bacteria including those in the genus of Rickettsia. We screened 459 I. scapularis ticks submitted to the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station Tick Testing Laboratory with the objectives to (1) examine differences in infection prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma Continues →

Bieber’s Lyme disease shines light on issues surrounding complicated illness

Bieber’s Lyme shines light on complicated disease Justin Bieber’s recent Lyme disease diagnosis has put another big spotlight on an illness that’s still shrouded in mystery, both in the public eye and the medical and scientific communities. The pop superstar from Stratford, Ont., announced his condition on his Instagram account earlier this week, making him the third major Canadian singer Continues →

Extensive Distribution of the Lyme Disease Bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato, in Multiple Tick Species Parasitizing Avian and Mammalian Hosts across Canada

Abstract Lyme disease, caused by the spirochetal bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Bbsl), is typically transmitted by hard-bodied ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). Whenever this tick-borne zoonosis is mentioned in medical clinics and emergency rooms, it sparks a firestorm of controversy. Denial often sets in, and healthcare practitioners dismiss the fact that this pathogenic spirochetosis is present in their area. For distribution of Bbsl Continues →

Nova Scotia, Canada: Lyme disease conference held in Bridgewater

November 17th, 2019 CTV reporter Heidi Petracek @HeidipCTV As the number of reported cases of Lyme disease on Nova Scotia’s South Shore continues to rise, so too does public concern. That’s why hundreds of residents and medical professionals gathered in Bridgewater this weekend for the Bridgewater Lyme Disease Conference. “When you look at the map of infected areas, this province Continues →

A Multiple Streams Approach to Understanding the Issues and Challenges of Lyme Disease Management in Canada’s Maritime Provinces

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 May; 16(9): 1531. Published online 2019 Apr 30. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16091531 Mario Levesque and Matthew Klohn Abstract This study examines potential challenges facing Lyme disease patients in Canada’s Maritime provinces—New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island—and considers how issues could be addressed. Reviews of both the academic and grey literature are complemented by surveys targeting both medical professionals Continues →

Canadian Cycling Magazine: Ticks and Lyme disease: What you need to know

With tick-borne illnesses on the rise in many parts of Canada, prevention is key for cyclists riding through the forest by Anne Francis  September 29, 2019 If you’ve ever had, or known someone who’s had Lyme disease, you know it’s no picnic–symptoms may resemble the flu (nausea, fever, chills, swollen glands, or a rash), and can be debilitating. And with tick-borne Continues →

Parenting When Children Have Lyme Disease: Fear, Frustration, Advocacy

Emilie M. Gaudet 1 , Odette N. Gould 1,*, Vett Lloyd 2 1 Department of Psychology, Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB E4L 1C7 Canada 2 Department of Biology, Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB E4L 1G7 Canada * Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Healthcare 2019, 7(3), 95; doi.org/10.3390/healthcare7030095 Abstract Increasing numbers of Canadians, including children and adolescents, are being infected with Borrelia burgdorferi and contracting Lyme disease. Continues →