Tag Archives: rickettsia

Prevalence of Infection and Co-Infection and Presence of Rickettsial Endosymbionts in Ixodes Scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in Connecticut, USA.

Abstract Ixodes scapularis is currently known to transmit 7 pathogens responsible for Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, babesiosis, tick-borne relapsing fever, ehrlichiosis, and Powassan encephalitis. Ixodes scapularis can also be colonized by endosymbiotic bacteria including those in the genus of Rickettsia. We screened 459 I. scapularis ticks submitted to the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station Tick Testing Laboratory with the objectives to (1) examine differences in infection prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma Continues →

Rickettsial infections of the central nervous system

[CanLyme Note: The Canadian medical community is absolutely under-informed on tick-borne disease. Medical leadership in Canada, managed by non-medical (PHAC), medically unethical (AMMI), scientifically unethical (CIHR), taxpayer funded gatekeepers for the for-profit medical industry insure never ending sickness that generates billions of dollars while denying access to policy making decisions of those most affected… patients and their experts. When will there Continues →

Tick-borne disease can be transmitted in as little as 15 seconds of attachment new study reveals.

[CanLyme Note: In the western regions of North America Dermacentor andersonii is a major vector of Rickettsia rickettsii. Because rickettsial infections in humans appear to be expressed from mild to fatal it is possible many misdiagnoses have occurred over the decades. “Rickettsial infections can affect many organs, including the central nervous system (CNS) ” Also, the possibility of congenital transmission must be explored Continues →

Co-infection of bacteria and protozoan parasites in Ixodes ricinus nymphs collected in the Alsace region, France

[CanLyme Note: ‘No Tick is a Good Tick’ Canadian ticks are equally co-infected.] https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ttbdis.2019.06.001 Abstract Fifty nymphal Ixodes ricinus ticks collected in Alsace, France, identified by morphological criteria and using MALDI-TOF MS, were tested by PCR to detect tick-associated bacteria and protozoan parasites. Seventy percent (35/50) of ticks contained at least one microorganism; 26% (9/35) contained two or more species. Several human pathogens Continues →

Watch New York State Senate Public Hearing on Lyme and Tick Borne Diseases

LYME SCI: Re-cap of New York’s Lyme disease hearing On August 29, the New York State Senate’s Task Force on Lyme and Tick-borne Diseases held a public hearing, with participation from many stakeholders. Public health officials, scientists, patients, and doctors from IDSA and ILADS all addressed the committee hearing, which was streamed live to a national audience. Senator Sue Serino, Continues →

Exotic ticks appear to be establishing themselves in Alaska

Alaska Dispatch News Monday, August 29th, 2016 While Alaskans have long endured dense mosquitoes and frigid air, we’ve always had the absence of venomous snakes and dog ticks. But the latter may be establishing themselves here. Ticks that infest red squirrels, snowshoe hares and a variety of birds have always been present in Alaska, but a team of biologists and veterinarians Continues →

Entomological Society of America Issues Statement on Tick-borne Diseases

[CanLyme note: CanLyme has no evidence to support the insinuation of the Entomological Society of America in the last sentence of their statement that there may have been “intentional” introduction of tick-borne diseases.] July 29th, 2015 The Entomological Society of America (ESA) strongly supports building a national strategy using Integrated Tick Management (ITM) to better control tick populations and reduce the Continues →

Mexico: Tick-borne illness spreads to Tijuana

By Bob McPhail July 17, 2015 A second case of rickettsiosis, a potentially fatal tick-borne bacterial illness, has been reported in Tijuana, state health officials announced on Wednesday, July 15. Earlier reports of the disease had been confined mostly to Mexicali, where, according to multiple news reports, 25 people lost their lives to the illness in 2014. So far this Continues →

Clinical Presentation, Convalescence, and Relapse of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Dogs Experimentally Infected via Tick Bite

Abstract Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne disease caused by R. rickettsii in North and South America. Domestic dogs are susceptible to infection and canine RMSF can be fatal without appropriate treatment. Although clinical signs of R. rickettsii infection in dogs have been described, published reports usually include descriptions of either advanced clinical cases or experimental infections caused Continues →

CDC Says Misperceptions Keep Kids from Getting Lifesaving Treatment for Tickborne Diseases

Last Updated: Wednesday, 18 March 2015 07:04 Short-term doxycycline use does not stain kids’ teeth, CDC/IHS study finds March 17, 2015 – Kids are five times more likely than adults to die from tickborne diseases like Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF). Doctors often avoid prescribing doxycycline, the most effective RMSF treatment, for young children because the drug’s warning label cautions Continues →

Spotted fever group rickettsiae in multiple hard tick species from Fairfax County, Virginia.

Henning TC, Orr JM, Smith JD, Arias JR, Norris DE. The W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health , Baltimore, Maryland. Abstract Spotted fever group rickettsiosis (SFGR) is a potentially fatal disease that has displayed increasing incidence in the United States in recent years. The most well-known and severe type of Continues →

A seroepidemiologic study of human infections with spotted fever group rickettsiae in North Carolina

Meagan F. Vaughn et al,  September 2014, doi:10.1128/JCM.01733-14 ABSTRACT Increasing entomologic and epidemiologic evidence suggests that spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) other than Rickettsia rickettsii are responsible for spotted fever rickettsioses in the US. A retrospective seroepidemiologic study was conducted on stored acute and convalescent sera that had been submitted for Rocky Mountain spotted fever testing to the North Carolina State Laboratory Continues →