Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

[CanLyme Note:  Judith Miklossy, PhD, was a founding Board member of CanLyme in 2003 and remained until she moved back to her home in Switzerland from British Columbia in 2009. Her research ethics and standards are impeccable and well recognized.]

By Jill U. Adams TheScientist

In late 2011, Drexel University dermatology professor Herbert Allen was astounded to read a new research paper documenting the presence of long, corkscrew-shape bacteria called spirochetes in postmortem brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease.1 Combing data from published reports, the International Alzheimer Research Center’s Judith Miklossy and colleagues had found evidence of spirochetes in 451 of 495 Alzheimer’s brains. In 25 percent of cases, researchers had identified the spirochete as Borrelia burgdorferi, a causative agent of Lyme disease. Control brains did not contain the spirochetes.

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  1. Cathy on said:

    I think the real question is can microbes/infection cause the destruction/degeneration of nerves in the brain. I think the answer is yes.

  2. Fred on said:

    Not treated, invasive Borrelia infection in the brain tissue can cause dementia (alzheimer), the so-called advanced neuroborreliosis (ANB).

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